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Russian Church abroad to join with the Russian church

 
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PostPosted: May 16 2006    Post subject: Russian Church abroad to join with the Russian church
May 16 2006
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Senior MP hails possible Russian Orthodox churches' reunification 19:16 | 13/ 05/ 2006

MOSCOW, May 13 (RIA Novosti) - The reunification of the Russian Orthodox Church and the Russian Orthodox Church Outside of Russia would be an event of tremendous importance, a senior member of the Russian lower chamber of parliament said Saturday.

"This would be a great event," said Natalia Narochnitskaya, deputy head of the State Duma's international committee and president of the Historical Perspective Foundation, a non-governmental organization. "The Russian people have risen to this historic challenge."

The ROCOR approved a resolution at its All-Diaspora Council Friday to reunify with the Moscow Patriarchate, the move that lays the groundwork for a canonical decision on the matter. According to the resolution, the ROCOR could be a self-governed branch within the Moscow Patriarchate, similar to the Ukrainian Orthodox Church.

Narochnitskaya said the resolution was the Council's main outcome.

"The Church, as Corpus Christi, will be united, even though as an institution it will have some organizational specifics," she said, adding that it was not important how long the process might take.

Revolutions in 1917 and the ensuing Civil War in Russia caused a split in the Russian Orthodox Church in the 1920s, when some top clergy in exile refused to be subordinated to Church leaders who allegedly collaborated with the Communists.

Narochnitskaya said it was extremely important for a nation to reach internal accord and end a schism. She said reunification would help Russia bolster its spiritual linchpin, which holds everything together, turning a territory with natural resources into a state and an agglomeration of people into a nation.

"We have made a spiritual effort, crucial for Russia's further existence," she said.

Narochnitskaya said the ROC's membership in the World Council of Churches, a liberal ecumenical movement that brings together more than 340 churches, denominations, and fellowships in more than 100 countries, was not an obstacle to the Orthodox Church's reunification.

She dismissed some of ROCOR officials' criticism of the ROC for contacts with the state throughout the Soviet era, saying it was impossible to live in a state without interacting with it.

Norochnitskaya said the ROC, on the contrary, helped people in the former Soviet Union preserve their faith.

"We have always been grateful to them [ROC clergy], as they preserved in love and faith the Russia we have lost," the MP said.

She said joining together modern Russia and a Russia remembered and preserved by Russian emigrants was an objective facing the present generation.
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PostPosted: May 16 2007    Post subject: re: Russian Church abroad to join with the Russian church Only supports IE browsers and Requires Microsoft Agent Reply with quote

Russians repair Orthodox schism


By Jan Repa
BBC Europe analyst



A branch of the Russian Orthodox Church - whose members fled abroad to escape the Bolshevik Revolution - is to be reunited with the main body of the Church at a ceremony in Moscow on Thursday.
The reconciliation has been strongly supported by President Vladimir Putin, who is expected to attend.

Leaders of the New York-based Russian Orthodox Church Abroad flew into Moscow on Tuesday for the historic reunification.

At the ceremony the Patriarch of Moscow, Alexy II, will join the leader of the Russian Orthodox Church Abroad, Metropolitan Lavry, in celebrating Mass at the Christ the Saviour Cathedral. It was blown up by the Soviet dictator Joseph Stalin, and rebuilt after the collapse of communism.

On Saturday, the two will jointly consecrate a new church on a site in southern Moscow, where the Soviet secret police shot thousands of Orthodox priests.

Forced exile

The Russian Orthodox Church Abroad owes its origin to the civil war - which followed the Russian Revolution of 1917 and ended with the victory of the militantly atheist Bolsheviks over the monarchist Whites.

Exiled bishops and clerics proclaimed the Russian Orthodox Church Abroad at a meeting in Serbia in 1922 - later relocating to New York.


In 1927, it broke off relations with the Russian Orthodox hierarchy in Moscow - saying it had fallen under Bolshevik control.
Ruthlessly persecuted by the Soviet regime, the Russian Orthodox Church has recovered some of its old influence since the break-up of the Soviet Union in 1991.

Although church attendance remains relatively low, former Soviet functionaries like President Putin and his predecessor, the late President Boris Yeltsin, have emphasised their new-found status as Orthodox believers and have made a point of being seen at major religious festivals.

Mr Putin, in particular, has tried to involve the Russian Orthodox Church in the task of reviving a sense of Russian patriotism and "great power" consciousness. Paradoxically, this includes rehabilitating certain aspects of the Soviet past - Mr Putin himself describing the break-up of the Soviet Union as a "tragedy".

Church rivalry

Historically, the Russian Orthodox Church's connections with the Russian state were strong and close. It was a mainstay of the tsarist regime and a champion of Russian cultural exceptionalism.

Ranked fifth in order of seniority by the other Orthodox Churches - after Constantinople (Istanbul), Alexandria, Antioch and Jerusalem - it has traditionally striven to assume first position.

In 1981, the Russian Orthodox Church Abroad proclaimed Russia's last Tsar, Nicholas II, and his family - all shot by the Bolsheviks in 1918 - as saints. Seven years ago, the Orthodox Church in Russia did the same.

Nevertheless, some members of the Russian Orthodox Church Abroad remain unhappy about this week's reunion - and have threatened to break away.

A spokesman for the Russian Orthodox Church Abroad, Archpriest Alexander Lebedev, is quoted by the Russian Interfax news agency as stressing his Church's devotion to "Russianness" - and suggesting it was uneasy about the Moscow Patriarchate's ecumenical contacts with other, non-Orthodox, Christians - notably its membership of the World Council of Churches.

But he accepted that its membership would continue "for some time to come" - in order to stop the Patriarchate of Constantinople stepping into its place.


Story from BBC NEWS:
http://news.bbc.co.uk/go/pr/fr/-/2/hi/europe/6662105.stm

Published: 2007/05/16 13:21:07 GMT

© BBC MMVII
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PostPosted: May 18 2007    Post subject: re: Russian Church abroad to join with the Russian church Only supports IE browsers and Requires Microsoft Agent Reply with quote

http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/europe/6664491.stm


Russian Church ends 80-year split

The Russian Orthodox Church Abroad has reunited with the Russian Orthodox Church after 80 years of schism sparked by the Bolshevik revolution.
The move was sealed by Patriarch Alexy II and the head of the Russian Orthodox Church Abroad, Metropolitan Lavry, at an elaborate ceremony in Moscow.

Reunification talks began after the collapse of the Soviet Union in 1991.

But some clergy abroad are rejecting the move. They say that many priests in Russia collaborated with Communists.

Long road

Alexy II and Metropolitan Lavry signed the reunification agreement in a ceremony at the Christ the Saviour Cathedral in Moscow.


"By this act, canonical communion within the local Russian Orthodox Church is hereby restored," the act said.

Russian President Vladimir Putin attended the ceremony, shown live on television.

Talks to re-establish ties between the Russian Orthodox Church in exile and its mother church began soon after the collapse of the USSR, which ignited a revival of organised religion in Russia.

A major step was reached when Church leaders in Moscow elevated the murdered Tsar Nicholas II and his family to the status of sainthood in 2000, the BBC's religious affairs correspondent Mike Lanchin reports.

In 2006, the Russian Orthodox Church allowed the remains of the tsar's mother to be reburied in St Petersburg.

One of the last sticking points was disagreement over who would own the extensive property in the hands of the exiled church in the US, Europe and even Israel.

The agreement is that these remain as they are, our correspondent says. The exiles also retain control over the appointment of their own priests.

Schism

The Russian Orthodox Church Abroad owes its origin to the civil war - which followed the Bolshevik Revolution of 1917 and ended with the victory of the militantly atheist Communists over the monarchist Whites.

Exiled bishops and clerics proclaimed the Russian Orthodox Church Abroad at a meeting in Serbia in 1922 - later relocating to the United States.

It cut all ties with its mother church in 1927, after the leader of the church in Russia, Patriarch Sergiy, declared loyalty to the Communists.

The New York-based Church says it has nearly 500,000 members.

The Moscow Patriarchate counts nearly 70% of Russia's population of about 142 million as its members.

Story from BBC NEWS:
http://news.bbc.co.uk/go/pr/fr/-/2/hi/europe/6664491.stm

Published: 2007/05/17 07:52:23 GMT

© BBC MMVII
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PostPosted: June 13 2007    Post subject: re: Russian Church abroad to join with the Russian church Only supports IE browsers and Requires Microsoft Agent Reply with quote

This has been very interesting as the OCA was formed from the Russian Orthodox Church. Within 8 miles from my home is a ROCOR church and an OCA church. The members and the priests speak fondly of each other. Interesting! Very interesting!
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PostPosted: June 13 2007    Post subject: re: Russian Church abroad to join with the Russian church Only supports IE browsers and Requires Microsoft Agent Reply with quote

Any action that leads to the solution of problems with in Orthodoxy is good.
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